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Wiese, Annjeanette Michelle

Instructor

Positions

Research Areas research areas

Research

research overview

  • Annjeanette Wiese (Ph.D., Comparative Literature) is Associate Chair and Director of Undergraduate Studies of the Humanities Program at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Her book Narrative Truthiness: The Logic of Complex Truth in Hybrid (Non)Fiction (2021) was published as a part of the University of Nebraska Press’s Frontiers of Narrative Series. She has published articles on experimental narrative in College Literature, Journal of Narrative Theory, Prose Studies, Frontiers of Narrative Studies, Narrative, and Style (forthcoming). She is currently working on a book project in which she explores the narratological lessons we can learn from experimental or unnatural narrative.

keywords

  • narrative theory, rhetorical theory, experimental literature, modern and postmodern literature, fictionality, fiction and nonfiction, hybrid (non)fiction

Publications

selected publications

Teaching

courses taught

  • HUMN 1001 - Forms of Narrative: An Introduction to Humanities
    Primary Instructor - Spring 2022 / Fall 2022
    Introduces students to forms of narrative from different historical, geographical, and cultural contexts in different media in order to explore how narrative, as cognitive tool and form of representation, functions as a means of understanding human experience. Students learn to analyze and interpret narratives and improve critical thinking, the practice of close reading, and written and verbal communication. Serves to introduce students to the types of questions and methods of interpretation encountered in Humanities.
  • HUMN 1110 - Introduction to Humanities: Literature 1
    Primary Instructor - Fall 2018 / Fall 2019 / Fall 2020 / Fall 2021
    Introduces students to works from the major Western literary periods (Classical, Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque) from the 8th c. BC to the early 17th c. AD comparatively, i.e., outside their national literary boundaries. Theorizes interdisciplinary, genre studies, periodization, comparativism, thematology, hermeneutics, criticism, etc. May be taken separately from HUMN 1120.
  • HUMN 1120 - Introduction to Humanities: Literature 2
    Primary Instructor - Spring 2018 / Spring 2019 / Spring 2020 / Spring 2021
    Introduces students to works from the major Western literary periods (Baroque, Enlightenment, Romanticism, Realism, Modernism) from the 17th- through the 20th-centuries comparatively, i.e., outside their national literary boundaries. Theorizes interdisciplinarity, genre studies, periodization, comparativism, thematology, hermeneutics, criticism.May be taken separately from HUMN 1110.
  • HUMN 2000 - Methods and Approaches to the Humanities
    Primary Instructor - Fall 2018 / Fall 2019 / Fall 2020 / Fall 2021 / Fall 2022
    Provides a transition from the introductory courses to the upper-division courses. Introduces the various technical methods and topics encountered in the department's comparative, interdisciplinary upper-division courses, including cultural studies, rhetoric, translation, hermeneutics, word/image studies.
  • HUMN 3210 - Narrative
    Primary Instructor - Spring 2019 / Fall 2019 / Fall 2020 / Fall 2021 / Fall 2022
    Explores the nature of narrative in literature, film, and the visual arts.
  • HUMN 3500 - Literatures of Consciousness
    Primary Instructor - Fall 2018 / Spring 2020 / Spring 2021 / Spring 2022
    Facilitates a complex and productive understanding of consciousness by analyzing and synthesizing interdisciplinary works (including literature, film and theoretical and scientific texts). This interdisciplinary approach enables students to think deeply about the following questions: what is consciousness? How do we think and perceive? What does it mean to be "neurotypical"? What does all of this have to do with who we are?
  • HUMN 4170 - Fiction and Reality: Literature, Science, and Culture
    Primary Instructor - Spring 2018 / Spring 2019 / Spring 2020 / Spring 2021 / Spring 2022
    Explores the significance of how one defines "fiction" and "reality". Begins by defining the core concepts and compares them with related terms. Lectures and discussions analyze the implications of these concepts from the perspective of a variety of disciplines and in the context of diverse issues in order to develop a critical awareness of them. Reading and writing intensive. Recommended requisite: HUMN 2000 and restricted to students with 57-180 credits (Junior or Senior).
  • HUMN 4950 - Honors Thesis
    Primary Instructor - Spring 2018 / Fall 2018
    Supervised project on a topic of the student's own choosing. It should demonstrate ability in interdisciplinary (such as literature and art, art and music, film and literature, literature and theory), extensive research, critical thinking, and excellent writing skills. The thesis is submitted to the Honors Program of the College of Arts and Sciences and is orally defended.

Background

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